Rehospitalisation after heart failure is higher in people with HIV


  • Daniela Ovadia — Agenzia Zoe
  • Medical News
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Key messages

  • People living with HIV (PWH) have an increased risk of heart failure (HF) and are ageing.
  • The propensity-matched study shows that among US patients admitted with HF, PWH have an increased risk for HF and all-cause rehospitalisation after HF admission compared with uninfected controls at both 30 and 90 days.
  • This risk is consistent across age groups, gender, types of HF and presence or absence of coronary artery disease or chronic kidney disease.

 

It is known that people living with HIV (PWH) are at increased risk of heart failure (HF). Given their life expectancy (73% of PWH will be 50 years or older by 2030) the HF prevalence should increase.

This study shows that among patients admitted with HF, those with HIV have increased risk of HF rehospitalizations compared with uninfected people at 30 days and 90 days.

Authors identified patients (1,112 PWH matched with 1,112 uninfected controls, based on 45 characteristics) discharged with a primary diagnosis of HF in the 2016 Nationwide Readmissions Database, which includes discharge data accounting for 56.6% of US hospitalisations.

Risk of HF rehospitalisation (11.2% at 30 days and 19.2% at 90 days) was higher in PWH within 30 days (hazard ratio [HR] 1.45; P=0.004) and 90 days (HR 1.41; P

The risk was consistent across age groups (≤65 vs >65 years), gender, types of HF (diastolic vs systolic), in cases of coronary artery disease or chronic kidney disease.

Female gender, depression and systolic versus HF not otherwise specified were associated with 90-day HF rehospitalisation of PWH, and diastolic HF with lower risk.

Limitations: lack of information on CD4+ count, viral load and medications.