Scientists identify 35 genes linked to CKD risk

  • University of Manchester
  • 22 Nov 2018

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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Scientists have identified 35 genes that possibly predispose individuals to chronic kidney disease (CKD). The discovery was made by an international team led by researchers at the University of Manchester.

Researchers identified the genes by applying 'next-generation RNA sequencing' on one of the largest collections of kidneys. They believe this discovery could boost their understanding of the substantially under-diagnosed condition.

According to the Lead author, Professor Maciej Tomaszewski from University of Manchester, although the development CKD is known to be strongly driven by a genetic component, its precise genetic mechanisms are poorly understood which has decelerated the development of new diagnostic tests and treatments.

Co-author, Professor Adrian Woolf from University of Manchester, stated that one of the genes, mucin-1, was particularly interesting. It is believed to generate a sticky protein called mucin, which forms a coating within the renal tubules. Some rare families with inherited kidney failure have already been identified as having a mutation of mucin-1.

Professor Tomaszewski said: "We hope that some of the kidney genes we discovered may become attractive targets for the development of future diagnostics and treatment for patients with chronic kidney disease."

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