Sleep duration affects stroke risk differently based on race


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Sleep duration affects stroke risk differently by race and sex, with new research suggesting both long and short sleep duration could have different consequences.

Researchers examined data on 16,733 black and white adults aged at least 45 years without a history of stroke or sleep-disordered breathing, who reported their habitual sleep duration as less than six hours, 6.0-6.9 hours, 7.0-8.9 hours (reference) or at least nine hours from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. 

They found short sleep duration was significantly associated with a decreased risk for stroke among black participants (hazard ratio [HR] 0.49; 95% CI 0.28-0.85; P<.05 and particularly among black men ci p whereas long sleep duration was significantly associated with increased risk for stroke white>

“More research is needed to determine the mechanisms behind these relationships. In the meantime, this emphasises how important it is to better monitor and control cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged to older people who have long sleep periods,” said study author Virginia J. Howard from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in the United States. 

The findings are published in Neurology.

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