Small pediatric ureteral stones pass spontaneously most of the time

  • Elmacı AM & al.
  • J Pediatr Surg
  • 22 May 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Children with ureteral stones

Why this matters

  • Noninvasive treatment for pediatric ureterolithiasis eliminates the risk for intervention-related complications.

Study design

  • Researchers reviewed the health records of pediatric patients diagnosed with a single ureteral stone (N=70; 38 boys, 32 girls; median age, 4.7 years; median stone diameter, 7.0 mm), comparing those who spontaneously passed their stones with those who did not pass their stones during 2-4 weeks of follow-up.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • After a median time of 8 days (range, 3-34 days), 40 (57.1%) of patients spontaneously passed stones.
  • Spontaneous passage was associated with
  • Spontaneous passage was unrelated to age, hydronephrosis, and stone location.

Limitations

  • The study was a retrospective case series with a small sample size and no comparison group.
  • Results may not be generalizable to populations with low stone prevalence.

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