Statin use linked with lower risk of dementia after concussion


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Findings from a new study suggest a “potential long-term protective association" between statin use and the risk of dementia after a concussion, a link, which the authors say, “justifies future research”. 

As part of a multi-centre double cohort study, researchers examined data on 28,815 adults aged 66 years or older to investigate whether statin use is associated with an increased or decreased risk of dementia after a concussion. Of these, 7,058 adults received a statin and 21,757 did not. 

Over a mean follow-up of 3.9 years, 4,727 patients subsequently developed dementia. The authors found patients who received a statin had a 13 per cent reduced risk of dementia compared with patients who did not receive a statin (relative risk 0.87; 95% CI 0.81-0.93; P<.001 rosuvastatin use was associated with the largest risk reduction and simvastatin smallest reduction.>

Presenting the research in JAMA Neurology, the authors said that while concussion is often popularised as a problem in athletic youth, and tends to be underdiagnosed in older individuals, these results suggest that concussions are a common injury in older adults. They say a future randomised trial based on the findings is justified.

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