Steep rise in liver cancer deaths in the UK

  • Cancer Research UK
  • 1 Nov 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

According to a new report from Cancer Research UK, mortality from lung cancer has increased by around 50% in the past decade and three times since records commenced.

New statistics indicate that around 5700 individuals died from liver cancer in 2017 in the UK, the highest ever annual mortality rate recorded. This figure has increased from 3200 deaths in 2007. Among all cancer types, liver cancer accounted for the largest increase in mortality rates over the past decade and the most rapid increase in mortality since recording began in the UK.

An estimated 5900 individuals are diagnosed with liver cancer each year in the UK. The figure is expected to rise by 38 per cent between 2014 and 2035. Among several factors influencing the risk for liver cancer, being overweight or obese and smoking have been identified as the two key preventable causes associated with liver cancer cases. Liver cancer is often difficult to diagnose at an early stage and one of the hardest malignancies to treat. Thus, the five-year survival rate for liver cancer ranges between 6 per cent and 37 per cent depending on age and sex.

Michelle Mitchell, Chief Executive of Cancer Research UK, said: "A lot of progress has been made saving lives from cancer, but it’s worrying to see deaths from liver cancer increasing at such an alarming rate."