Study questions survival benefits of β-blockers after coronary artery bypass grafting


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Findings from a new study have led its authors to question the routine use of β-blockers to improve survival after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). 

Researchers examined data from the SWEDEHEART registry to determine the use of secondary prevention medications, including statins, β-blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors and platelet inhibitors in 28,812 patients in Sweden who underwent first-time CABG between 2006 and 2015. They also looked at the association between medication use and mortality.

The authors found that while the use of secondary prevention medications after CABG was high early among participants after surgery, this decreased significantly over time. 

They reported that statins (hazard ratio [HR] 0.56; 95% CI 0.52-0.60; P<.001 raas inhibitors ci platelet were significantly associated with a lower mortality risk however there was no significant association between the use of and>

"This study highlights the importance of continuous secondary prevention medication with statins, platelet inhibitors, and RAAS inhibitors after CABG to improve long-term survival, whereas the routine use of β-blockers is questionable,” the authors concluded. 

The findings are published in the European Heart Journal