Study suggests ways to improve job satisfaction among general practitioners


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Employing case managers and using electronic health records are linked to lower job dissatisfaction amongst general practitioners (GPs), suggests a new research. 

The study looked at the association between organisational and functional features of GP practices with job dissatisfaction in 11 countries by conducting a secondary analysis of the 2015 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey of Primary Care Physicians. 

The study found dissatisfaction at work ranged from 8.1 per cent in Norway to 37.4 per cent in Germany.

Among 12,049 GPs surveyed, dissatisfaction was linked with limited possibilities of offering same-day appointments, long delays in hospital discharge notices, high weekly workloads and heavy administrative burdens. 

The study found however that using electronic health records (odds ratio [OR] 0.82; 95% CI 0.68-0.98) and having an in-practice case manager (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75-0.95) were associated with lower dissatisfaction. GP dissatisfaction was also lower when they provided home care visits (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.83-0.96). 

Presenting the findings in the Annals of Family Medicine, the authors suggested that instead of thinking about reducing GPs' overall workloads, “it might be more pertinent" to foster new organisational methods. “Group practices including other professionals, such as case managers, and the use of electronic health records seem to be good starting points,” they said.