Subclinical hyperthyroidism linked to increased fracture risk

  • Zhu H & al.
  • Endocrine
  • 13 Nov 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased risk for fracture, whereas subclinical hypothyroidism is not, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Why this matters

  • The relationship between thyroid dysfunction and fracture risk was uncertain.

Key results

  • Subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with increased risk for any fracture (relative risk [RR], 1.17; P<.001 hip fractures p=".003)," spine and nonspine>
  • Subclinical hypothyroidism was not significantly associated with risk for any fracture (RR, 1.14; P=.166), hip fracture (RR, 1.14; P=.068), spine fracture (RR, 0.95; P=.818), or nonspine fracture (RR, 1.09; P=.277).
  • Subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with reduced distal forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in women (P=.039) and lower ultradistal forearm BMD in men (P=.031) and women (P=.027).
  • Subclinical hypothyroidism was associated with increased femur neck BMD in women (P=.026).

Study design

  • 24 studies (313,557 participants) were included in the meta-analysis.
  • Funding: Pudong New Area Health System of Shanghai.

Limitations

  • Heterogeneity between included studies.