Survey finds hazardous levels of drinking among a fifth of doctors

  • Savage E & al.
  • Occup Med (Lond)
  • 22 Jun 2020

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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A new survey found hazardous levels of alcohol consumption among a fifth of doctors. The findings were published in the journal Occupational Medicine.

A self-reported survey regarding alcohol consumption was carried out among doctors at an acute London Trust. The survey comprised nine questions adapted from the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) and CAGE questionnaire.

The survey completion rate was 24 per cent. The findings showed that 14 per cent of respondents abstained from drinking, 21 per cent drank once a month or less, 31 per cent drank between two to four times a month, 25 per cent drank two to three times a week and nine per cent drank on more than four occasions in a week.

In the two years preceding the survey, nine per cent of respondents said they were unable to perform their expected duties on at least one occasion as a result of drinking. Five per cent of respondents reported being concerned about the effect of alcohol on their performance, two per cent reported being annoyed by criticism of their drinking, nine per cent had the guilt of drinking and four per cent said they needed an eye-opener.

Eighteen per cent of the respondents expressed a desire to curb their alcohol consumption; however, 43 per cent were uncertain where to seek assistance.

"Our findings reiterate the importance of identifying and addressing high alcohol consumption in medical staff," the authors said.