Tibolone ameliorates depression in perimenopausal women

  • J Affect Dis

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Tibolone, a hormone therapy widely available in Europe and Australia, ameliorates depression in women undergoing the menopausal transition, according to a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

Why this matters

  • Adjunctive tibolone, with more research, may become a treatment option for perimenopausal women whose depression is notoriously hard to treat.

Study design

  • Double-blind study enrolled 44 perimenopausal/early postmenopausal women with depression (first-onset, relapse, or persistent depressive symptoms).
  • Participants were randomly assigned to adjunctive tibolone (2.5 mg/day; n=22) or placebo (n=22) group.
  • Funding: National Health and Medical Research Council.

Key results

  • The mean level of Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores dropped about 1 point every 2 weeks (unconditional linear model; slope, −1.04).
  • The slope negative regression coefficient showed that treatment with tibolone significantly predicted the linear slope (conditional latent growth model; P=.001).
  • The MADRS scores in the tibolone group significantly dropped by 1.65 compared with placebo group.
  • The 2 groups did not significantly differ in terms of side effects (range, P=.12 to P=.99).

Limitations

  • Effects of tibolone were only monitored over the course of 12 weeks.

Coauthored with Chitra Ravi, MPharm

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit