Tinea Cruris

  • Denise M. Aaron, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

  • MSD Manual
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  • Tinea cruris is a dermatophyte infection of the groin.

    Tinea cruris is a Overview of Dermatophytoses that is commonly caused by Trichophyton rubrum or T. mentagrophytes. The primary risk factors are associated with a moist environment (ie, warm weather, wet and restrictive clothing, obesity causing constant apposition of skinfolds). Men are affected more than women because of apposition of the scrotum and thigh.

    Tinea Cruris

    Typically, a pruritic, ringed lesion extends from the crural fold over the adjacent upper inner thigh. Infection may be bilateral. Lesions may be complicated by maceration, miliaria, secondary bacterial or candidal infection, and reactions to treatment. In addition, scratch dermatitis and lichenification can occur. Recurrence is common because fungi may repeatedly infect susceptible people or people with Onychomycosis or Tinea Pedis, which can serve as a dermatophyte reservoir. Flare-ups occur more often during summer.

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  • Last modified in -By Denise M. Aaron
    Last review 10-2018