Treatment disparities affect emergency department patients with urinary stones

  • Schoenfeld D & al.
  • Urolithiasis
  • 25 Apr 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Treatment disparities affect emergency department patients with urinary stones.

Why this matters

  • New data may help physicians address inconsistent care.

Study design

  • Researchers reviewed the health records of patients seeking emergency department treatment for ureteral stones (n=1200; mean age, 45±15.6 years; 51% women; 40% Hispanic; 21% white; 15% non-Hispanic black; 20% other or multiracial).
  • They used multivariate logistic regression models to examine associations between treatment outcomes and patient characteristics such as age, sex, race or ethnicity, BMI, socioeconomic status, and insurance status.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Compared with those aged
    • Aged 55-64 years: 0.48 (0.27-0.86; P=.01); or
    • Aged ≥65 years: 0.46 (0.21-1.00; P=.05).
  • Women were less likely than men to:
    • Undergo diagnostic imaging: 0.52 (0.35-0.76; P=.001); or
    • Receive alpha blockers: 0.68 (0.49-0.92; P=.014).
  • Patients with the lowest socioeconomic status underwent less imaging than patients with the highest: 0.50 (0.27-0.90; P=.02).

Limitations

  • The study was retrospective.