Triclosan-coated sutures are effective for preventing surgical site infections

  • Ahmed I & al.
  • BMJ Open
  • 3 Sep 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • This meta-analysis found that the use of triclosan-coated sutures was significantly associated with a reduction in the risk for surgical site infections (SSIs) following closure of a surgical wound compared with standard sutures.

Why this matters

  • SSIs are common and serious complications of all surgical interventions.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 25 randomised controlled trials (n=11,957); 6008 patients randomly assigned to triclosan-coated sutures and 5949 to non-triclosan-coated sutures.
  • Outcome: development of SSIs at 30 days post-operatively.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • There were 420 and 581 instances of SSI in the triclosan-coated and standard suture groups, respectively.
  • The risk of developing SSI was significantly lower in the triclosan group vs standard suture groups (relative risk [RR], 0.73; 95% CI, 0.65-0.82; I2=17%).
  • Sensitivity analysis revealed that triclosan-coated sutures vs standard sutures were associated with a significantly lower risk for SSI in:
    • clean surgery (RR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.58-0.88), and
    • contaminated surgery (RR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.27-0.7).

Limitations

  • Heterogeneity among included studies.