UK maternal influenza immunization rates are still subpar

  • Walker JL & al.
  • J Infect Dis
  • 1 Jan 2020

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Administering inactivated influenza vaccine to pregnant women prevents laboratory-confirmed influenza infection, hospitalizations in infants aged
  • Related editorial.

Why this matters

  • Encourage inactivated influenza vaccine uptake in pregnant women to prevent infant influenza, influenza-related hospitalizations.
  • Reinforce that maternal vaccination protects young infants through transplacental antibody transfer. 

Key results

  • 37 infants had confirmed influenza in 2013-2014 and 81 did in 2014-2015. 
  • 19% and 25% had vaccinated mothers in these respective time frames. 
  • Overall vaccine uptake was 45.2% and 49.2% for these years.
  • Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was 70% (95% CI, 26%-88%) in 2013-2014 and 50% (95% CI, 12%-78%) in 2014-2015. 
  • By strain: in 2014-2015, VE was 50% (95% CI, 11%-72%), antigenetically/genetically mismatched, A(H3N2)-dominant vs in 2013-2014, when VE was 66% (95% CI, 18%-84%), matched A(H1N1)pdm09-dominant. 
  • Overall VE adjusted for week, season, region, ethnicity was 66% (P=.46).

Study design

  • Retrospective cohort analysis reassessing maternal seasonal influenza vaccination for preventing influenza, influenza-related hospitalizations in UK infants aged
  • Database: Clinical Practice Research Datalink pregnancy registry.
  • Funding: National Institute for Health Research.

Limitations

  • Retrospective.
  • Residual confounding. 
  • VE covariates limited by data availability.