Use of smoking cessation services in Northern Ireland

  • Department of Health-Northern Ireland
  • 11 Sep 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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The Department of Health in Northern Ireland recently published the latest statistics on smoking cessation services in the country. The report provides data on individuals accessing smoking cessation services during 2018-2019 and 52-week follow-up data for those who accessed the services in 2017-2018.

Key findings from the report are as follows:

  • The proportion of individuals accessing smoking cessation services has significantly declined in the last five years. The prevalence of cigarette smoking has also concurrently decreased from 22 per cent in 2014-2015 to 18 per cent in 2017-2018.
  • Nicotine replacement therapy was the most popular cessation intervention, with 70 per cent of individuals opting for it.
  • At the four-week follow-up, 58 per cent of individuals setting a quit date had successfully quit. The overall four-week success rate was 60 per cent for males and 56 per cent for females.
  • Success rate at four weeks was 62 per cent for individuals aged ≥60 years and 38 per cent for those aged 11-17 years.
  • The four-week success rate was 56 per cent for individuals in the most deprived quintile versus 63 per cent for those in the least deprived quintile.
  • At the four-week follow-up, 61 per cent of pregnant women had successfully quit, 25 per cent had not quit and 14 per cent could not be contacted.
  • At the 52-week follow-up of individuals who that had quit at four weeks in 2017-2018, 37 per cent were still tobacco free, 25 per cent had relapsed and 38 per cent could not be contacted.