Vaping helps smokers quit, but raises risk for relapse

  • Gomajee R & al.
  • JAMA Intern Med
  • 15 Jul 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Among current tobacco smokers, daily use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), commonly known as vaping, was tied to reduced cigarette smoking and higher odds of smoking cessation.
  • However, daily use of e-cigarettes raised the risk for relapse in former smokers.

Why this matters

  • 15.3% of adult smokers in the United States and 14.6% in Europe use e-cigarettes.

Study design

  • 5400 current smokers and 2025 former smokers.
  • Funding: Agence Nationale de la Recherche; MSD; AstraZeneca; others.

Key results

  • 15.2% of current smokers and 8.7% of former smokers reported daily use of e-cigarettes.
  • In adjusted analysis, e-cigarette users smoked fewer estimated cigarettes daily than nonusers (11.2 vs 12.2; P<.001 and showed a greater decrease in cigarettes during follow-up> (−4.4 vs −2.7; P<.001>
  • E-cigarette users were more likely to quit smoking during follow-up than non-EC users (aRR, 1.67; P<.001>
  • The effect was stronger with e-cigarette use >1 year (aRR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.82-2.27) vs
  • Former smokers who used e-cigarettes were more likely to relapse to smoking (aRR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.25-2.30).
  • Limitations

    • All-French cohort.
    • No data on the daily frequency of e-cigarette use.