Visceral obesity linked to premature death in post-menopausal women


  • Priscilla Lynch
  • Univadis Medical News
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Central obesity in all weight classes of post-menopausal women was associated with higher risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality compared to those without central obesity, finds a new study in JAMA Network Open.

The cohort study examined associations of normal-weight central obesity with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in 156,624 post-menopausal women (mean age, 63.2 years), using BMI and waist circumference stratification.

During 2,811,187 person-years of follow-up, 43,838 deaths occurred, including 12,965 deaths from cardiovascular disease (29.6%) and 11,828 deaths from cancer (27.0%).

Compared with women with normal weight and no central obesity and adjusted for demographic characteristics, socio-economic status, lifestyle factors and hormone use, the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality was 1.31 (95% CI 1.20-1.42) among women with normal weight and central obesity; 0.91 (95% CI 0.89-0.94) among overweight women with no central obesity; 1.16 (95% CI 1.13-1.20) for overweight women with central obesity; 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-0.94) for obese women with no central obesity; and 1.30 (95% CI 1.27-1.34) for obese women with central obesity.

Compared to normal weight without central obesity, normal weight with central obesity was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.25; 95% CI 1.05-1.46) and cancer mortality (HR 1.20; 95% CI 1.01-1.43).