Visual problems common in survivors of acute stroke

  • Rowe FJ & al.
  • PLoS ONE
  • 1 Jan 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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According to a new study published in PLoS One, survivors of acute stroke may have a higher incidence and prevalence of visual problems.

Researchers at the University of Liverpool analysed stroke assessments of 1033 patients across three stroke units over a period of one year. Visual evaluation during their hospital stay included visual acuity, fields, inattention and perception and ocular alignment and motility.

With the exception of pre-existing eye problems, 48 per cent of all stroke admissions and 60 per cent of stroke survivors had new onset visual conditions. Total of 73 per cent had visual issues: 56 per cent had impaired central vision, 40 per cent had abnormal eye movements, 28 per cent had visual field loss, 27 per cent had visual inattention and 5 per cent visual perceptual disorders.

Professor Fiona Rowe, the lead author, said: "Our research shows that early visual screening and assessment is feasible and achievable within 72 hours of stroke onset and for those initially unable to be visually assessed, most can be assessed within one week of stroke onset."

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