Vitamin D and risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality

  • Fan X & al.
  • J Clin Endocrinol Metab
  • 4 Jul 2020

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations are non-linearly associated with a lower risk of all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality.

Why this matters

  • Findings suggest that thresholds of 45-60 nmol/L may represent a potential target to reduce the risk of premature death, which needs to be confirmed in future randomised controlled trials.

Study design

  • This UK Biobank study included 365,530 participants with 25(OH)D measurements and no history of CVD, cancer or diabetes between 2006 and 2010.
  • Primary outcome: all-cause and cause-specific mortality.
  • Funding: National Natural Science Foundation of China and others.

Key results

  • During a median follow-up of 8.9 (interquartile range, 8.3-9.5) years, 10,175 deaths were reported, including 1841 (18.1%) from CVD, 5737 (56.4%) from cancer and 2597 (25.5%) from other causes.
  • Compared with participants with 25(OH)D
  • all-cause mortality (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.79-0.86);
  • CVD mortality (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.68-0.86); and
  • other mortality (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60-0.73).
  • Participants with 25(OH)D ≥45 nmol/L vs those with
  • In the cancer-specific analysis, participants with 25(OH)D ≥45 nmol/L had a reduced risk of lung cancer mortality (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.72-0.93) compared with those with

    Limitations

    • Reverse causality cannot be excluded.