Vitamin D supplementation fails to boost BMD in elders

  • Aspray TJ & al.
  • Am J Clin Nutr
  • 8 Jan 2019

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Vitamin D supplementation, given in 3 different doses to community-dwelling elderly patients (≥70 years), is not associated with any differential effect on bone mineral density (BMD).

Why this matters

  • This randomized controlled trial (RCT) attempts to resolve the conflicting literature on the effect of vitamin D supplementation on bone health.

Study design

  • Single-center, double-blind RCT of 379 elders assigned to 1 of 3 monthly doses of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] over the course of 12 months: 12,000 IU (low group), 24,000 IU (medium group), or 48,000 IU (high group).
  • Osteoporotic patients had not received antiresorptive or anabolic treatment in 3 prior years.
  • Primary outcome: change from baseline in total hip BMD, assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.
  • Funding: Arthritis Research UK; Medical Research Council, UK.

Key results

  • Mean baseline plasma 25(OH)D level, 40.0±20.1 nmol/L.
  • At 12 months, there were between-group differences in mean 25(OH)D level: 55.9, 64.6, or 79.0 nmol/L (high vs low; P<.01 in the low- medium- and high-dose groups respectively.>
  • No differences found between groups in change in BMD at total hip or femoral neck: low vs medium group (P=.39; P=.43, respectively) and low- vs high-dose group (P=.08; P=.62, respectively).
  • No dose-related adverse events.

Limitations

  • Single-center.
  • Short follow-up.