Vitamin D supplementation may reduce inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers

  • Mansournia MA & al.
  • Horm Metab Res
  • 1 Jun 2018

  • from Sarfaroj Khan
  • Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • This meta-analysis suggests that in patients with diabetes, vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, respectively).
  •  Vitamin D supplementation significantly increased nitric oxide (NO), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total glutathione (GSH) levels.

Why this matters

  • Previous studies have shown that vitamin D intake may reduce inflammatory response and oxidative stress.
  • There are inconsistent results that patients with low vitamin D levels have high levels of inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers that have been shown high in people with low vitamin D levels; however, the reports have been inconsistent.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 33 randomised controlled trials (n=1053) identified after a search across MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane databases.
  • Funding: Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

Key results

  • Vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced serum hs-CRP levels (weighted mean difference [WMD], −0.27; P<.001 and increased no levels p in patients with diabetes.>
  • In patients with diabetes, vitamin D supplementation showed a significant reduction in serum MDA levels (WMD, −0.43; P<.001 and a significant increase in tac p gsh levels.>

Limitations

  • Unable to assess the dose-response association between supplementation and inflammation and oxidative biomarkers.
  • Publication bias; small sample size.