Vitamin E supplementation may lower systolic blood pressure

  • Emami MR & al.
  • J Hum Hypertens
  • 7 Mar 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • This meta-analysis suggests that vitamin E supplementation is associated with significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP) but increase in dosage and duration of intervention does not show any significant effect on SBP.
  • No significant effects are observed on diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP).

Why this matters

  • Although emerging evidence suggests that vitamin E may contribute to BP improvement, the effects of vitamin E on SBP, DBP and MAP remain controversial.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 18 studies involving 839 participants identified after a search across PubMed/Medline, SCOPUS and Google scholar.
  • Funding: National Research Foundation.

Key results

  • Overall, vitamin E supplementation significantly reduced SBP vs placebo (weighted mean difference [WMD], −3.4 mmHg; P<.001 i>2, 94%).
  • Vitamin E supplementation of 2, 96.5%) and ≤8 weeks intervention (WMD, −2.63 mmHg; P=.033; I2, 84%) showed significant reduction in SBP vs placebo.
  • Higher doses of vitamin E supplementation (≥400 mg/day; WMD, −2.04 mmHg; P=.284; I2, 80%) and >8 weeks (WMD, −4.03 mmHg; P=.382; I2, 96.3%) intervention did not show any significant effects on SBP vs placebo.
  • Vitamin E supplementation did not show any significant effects on DBP and MAP vs placebo.

Limitations

  • Heterogeneity among included studies.