Vitiligo tied to reduced risk for internal malignancies

  • Bae JM & al.
  • J Clin Oncol
  • 20 Feb 2019

  • curated by Brian Richardson, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Results from a Korean population study suggest that vitiligo is associated with reduced risk for internal malignancies, particularly colorectal, ovarian, and lung cancers.

Why this matters

  • It is hypothesized that autoimmune diseases such as vitiligo may increase immune surveillance throughout the body, targeting the development of cancer.

Key results

  • Patients with vitiligo had reduced incidence of internal malignancies compared with control subjects (612.9 vs 708.9 per 100,000 person-years; HR, 0.86; P<.001 style="list-style-type:circle;">
  • HR, 0.79 (95% CI, 0.74-0.85) in men.
  • HR, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.86-0.95) in women.
  • HR, 0.77 (95% CI, 0.67-0.88) in patients 20-39 years old.
  • HR, 0.83 (95% CI, 0.78-0.89) in patients 40-59 years old.
  • HR, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.86-0.97) in patients aged 60 years or older.
  • Patients with vitiligo specifically had reduced risk for colorectal cancer (HR, 0.62; P<.001 ovarian cancer lung esophageal kidney and leukemia but increased risk for thyroid bone>

    Study design

    • 101,078 patients with vitiligo and 202,156 control patients without vitiligo from the Korean National Health Insurance claims database were included.
    • Funding: None disclosed.

    Limitations

    • Retrospective study design.
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