Wearable device may improve insulin delivery in T2D

  • Sutton D & al.
  • Adv Ther
  • 10 May 2018

  • curated by Miriam Tucker
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • The V-Go (Valeritas, Inc.) may improve glycemic control and reduce costs in patients who require basal-bolus insulin delivery.

Why this matters

  • Frequency and timing of insulin injections are often barriers to achieving glycemic control.

Study design

  • Retrospective record review, 103 adults with diabetes (96% type 2) and baseline HbA1c >7% who initiated V-Go, including 22% insulin-naive, 56% previously receiving basal-bolus injection regimens, followed 14 months.   
  • Funding: Valeritas, Inc.

Key results

  • Significant mean reductions from baseline were seen in HbA1c at all points, with 82% below baseline at 14 months.
  • The percentage of patients with HbA1c >9.0% dropped from 59% to 26%, whereas 50% vs 17%, respectively, achieved HbA1c
  • Among 80 using insulin at baseline, mean total daily dose dropped by 17 units/day (P<.0001>
  • Cost savings from decreased total daily insulin dose exceeded V-Go cost, with $25 overall decrease per patient per month after switching from injection basal-bolus regimen.
  • Patients gained a mean 3.18 kg (P=.029) body weight, but those already receiving basal-bolus insulin gained just 0.26 kg (P=.897).
  • There was no increase in patient-reported hypoglycemia or device malfunctions.

Limitations

  • Retrospective observational study.
  • Cost calculated from prescriptions, not actual use.
  • Nonreturning patients excluded.
  • Hypoglycemia was self-reported.

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