WHI: persistent VMS up odds of breast cancer diagnosis

  • Chlebowski RT & al.
  • Menopause
  • 28 Dec 2018

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Women with persistent vasomotor symptoms (VMS) marked by hot flashes and/or night sweats may face a 13% increase in risk of breast cancer than women never experiencing VMS.
  • Their mortality rate with breast cancer is no higher.

Why this matters

  • Consider more frequent breast cancer screening for women with persistent VMS.

Study design

  • Prospective cohort of 25,499 postmenopausal women (age, 50-79 years) without breast cancer or any use of menopausal hormone therapy in the Women's Health Initiative.
  • Persistent VMS was self-reported moderate to severe hot flashes and/or night sweats within the prior 4 weeks of baseline; never VMS was never having these symptoms or by mild VMS.
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • Median follow-up was 17.9 years; 38% of the cohort had persistent VMS (median duration, 10+ years).
  • Persistent VMS was associated with a 13% higher risk of incident breast cancer than never VMS (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.27).
  • Persistent VMS (vs never VMS) was more likely associated with estrogen receptor-negative status (P=.018) and regional or distant spread (P=.002) of breast cancer.
  • Persistent VMS (vs never VMS) was not associated with higher breast-cancer specific mortality (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.88-2.02) or higher mortality (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.81-1.29).

Limitations

  • Observational design.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit