White meat is no better than red for lipid measures

  • Bergeron N & al.
  • Am J Clin Nutr
  • 4 Jun 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • White meat seems to be no better than red meat for reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, showing no relative benefit for lipid profiles in this trial .

Why this matters

  • Dietary recommendations are to limit red meat, with the implication that white meat is preferable for health.
  • These authors say that theirs is the first systematic comparison of the two.

Key results

  • Participants eating either red or white meat had higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol vs those who ate a nonmeat diet (P<.0001>
  • Apolipoprotein B measures were also higher with both meat diets (P<.0001>
  • The meat diets did not differ from each other for these measures. 
  • Body weight measures among groups were not significantly different.

Study design

  • 62 people had a diet high in saturated fatty acids and 51 had a diet low in saturated fatty acids, split among red meat, white meat, and nonmeat diets, 4 weeks each in random order.
  • Outcomes: various lipid measures.
  • Funding: NIH. 

Limitations

  • Short study, no fish diet included, grass-finished beef was not used.
  • Higher-fat red meat was not compared with lower-fat white meat because meats were matched for fat.