Widowed and divorced men have a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality

  • Heart
  • 1 May 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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A new research presented at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) Conference in Manchester, found that sex and marital status may influence the survival outcomes for common heart and circulatory diseases.

Researchers at Aston University investigated the effects of marital status or sex on the long-term risk for cardiovascular mortality in 1,816,230 individuals with a myocardial infarction, heart failure or atrial fibrillation (Afib) admitted to hospitals in the North of England between 2000 and 2014. Data analysis was performed as per the ACALM (Algorithm for Comorbidities, Associations, Length of stay and Mortality) study protocol.

The findings showed that widowed men with myocardial infarction had an 11 per cent higher likelihood of death than widowed women. Similarly, widowed men with heart failure and Afib had a 10 per cent and 13 per cent higher mortality risk, respectively, than their female counterparts with the same conditions. Divorced men with Afib had a 14 per cent higher likelihood of death than divorced women. Among married individuals, men with Afib had a 6 per cent higher risk of dying than women. In contrast, single men with heart failure had a 13 per cent lower mortality risk than single women.

According to the lead author, Dr Rahul Potluri, these findings will not only help in the identification of individuals requiring additional support but also help enhance the way support is provided. He added: "It’s important we look into providing holistic care and explore other factors, such as their support network, which can also have a big impact on a person’s health."