Women smokers four times more likely to be diagnosed with unruptured intracranial aneurysm


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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Women aged 30-60 years with a positive smoking history have a four-fold increased risk for having an unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA), according to a study published in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

The multicentre observational case-control study recruited women aged 30 to 60 years who underwent magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) during 2016-2018.

From 545 eligible patients, 113 aneurysm patients were matched to 113 controls.

The most common reason for imaging was chronic headaches (62.5% of cases, 44.3% of controls).

A positive smoking history was reported in 57.5 per cent of cases and 37.2 per cent of controls.

Multivariable analyses demonstrated a significant association between positive smoking history (OR 3.7; 95%CI 1.61-8.50), hypertension (OR 3.16; 95% CI 1.17-8.52) and both factors (OR 6.9; 95% CI 2.49-19.24) with incidental UIA.

The authors say the findings indicate that women aged between 30 and 60 years with a positive smoking history might benefit from a screening recommendation.