Yogurt, fiber consumption linked to lowered lung cancer risk

  • JAMA Oncol

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • People who consumed high amounts of yogurt and fiber were more than 30% less likely to develop lung cancer than those who consumed no yogurt and low levels of fiber.

Why this matters

  • Prior studies of a link between yogurt and fiber consumption and lung cancer risk yielded conflicting results.

Study design

  • Analysis of 10 cohort studies with 1.44 million people from the United States, Europe, and Asia between 2017 and 2019.
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • 18,822 lung cancer cases in a median follow-up of 8.6 years.
  • The highest quintile of fiber intake was associated with a significant decrease in lung cancer risk compared with the lowest quintile (aHR, 0.83; P<.001>
  • People who consumed low or high levels of yogurt had significantly lower lung cancer risk than those who ate no yogurt (aHR, 0.85 [P<.001 and ahr respectively>
  • People who consumed high amounts of yogurt and fiber had lower lung cancer risk than those who ate the lowest levels of fiber and no yogurt (overall HR, 0.67 [95% CI, 0.61-0.73]; current smokers HR, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.67-0.83]; and never smokers HR, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.54-0.89]).

Limitations

  • No data on types of fiber or yogurt consumed.

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