Young age at diagnosis tied to poorer breast cancer outcomes

  • Szollár A & al.
  • Eur J Surg Oncol
  • 5 Jun 2019

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Breast cancer in very young (aged ≤35 years) vs young (aged 36-45 years) patients is biologically more aggressive and tied to poorer survival.

Why this matters

  • Very young patients merit their own subgroup for clinical trials and further research.

Study design

  • Retrospective cohort with breast cancer (n=598) of the National Institute of Oncology, Hungary (2000-2014).
  • 297 patients were very young; 301 patients were young.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Median follow-up for very young patients was 69 months; that for young women was 79 months.
  • The very young vs young patients were more likely to:
    • have triple-negative breast cancer (31% vs 16.9%; P=.00008),
    • have estrogen receptor-negative cancer (8.4% vs 7.3%; P=.00008),
    • have distant metastasis at diagnosis (3% vs 0.3%; P=.01), and
    • receive chemotherapy (73.5% vs 66.7%; P=.049).
  • Very young vs young patients were less likely to receive endocrine therapy (57% vs 65.7%; P=.037).
  • No differences between groups in rates of radiotherapy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy.
  • Very young patients had worse DFS (P=.00004) and OS (P=.00005) than young patients.

Limitations

  • Lack of information on behavioral risk factors.
  • Low rate of BRCA testing.
  • Not clear whether cohort is multicenter or single center.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit