1 in 3 specialty and associate specialists report being bullied by a colleague


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Professional News
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Almost one in three specialty and associate specialists (SASs) and one in four locally employed (LE) doctors have been bullied or harassed by a colleague, according to a new report from the General Medical Council (GMC).

Earlier today (January 9) the GMC published the results of a survey of SASs and LE doctors. The survey ran for six weeks between May and June 2019. Over 6,400 doctors participated, with 3,151 (49%) SAS and 3,316 (51%) LE doctors.

Thirty per cent of SAS doctors and 23 per cent of LE doctors reported being bullied, undermined or harassed by a colleague in the last year. Approximately a sixth of participants who had experienced bullying described it as threatening or insulting comments or behaviour.

Burnout emerged as a significant issue, with 29 per cent of LE doctors and 25.1 per cent of SAS doctors strongly agreeing that they felt burnt out because of work. Over 40 per cent of LE (41.2%) and SAS (43.0%) doctors said they felt emotionally exhausted to a high or very high degree.

Over 22 per cent of LE doctors and almost 18 per cent of SAS doctors said they seldom or never have enough energy for family and friends.

This is the GMC’s first dedicated survey of this group of doctors and was designed to get a greater understanding of workplace experiences, concerns and aspirations.

Writing in the foreword of today’s report, Charlie Massey, GMC Chief Executive and Registrar, said the organisation will be working with employers and healthcare organisations to address the issues raised.