AAN 2019—Balance disturbances more common in people with HIV and sensory polyneuropathy


  • Daniel M. Keller, Ph.D
  • Conference Reports
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Balance disturbances are more common in people living with HIV (PLWH), especially if they have chronic distal sensory polyneuropathy (cDSPN) and/or are older, leading to an increased risk of falls.

Why this matters

  • Identifying PLWH with cDSPN may allow for better treatment planning to prevent balance disturbances, falls, and dependency in functioning.

Key results

  • Balance disturbances were more common in PLWH vs healthy controls (OR=2.7).
  • Among PLWH, balance disturbances were more common with vs without cDSPN (OR=3.3; 95% CI, 2.6-4.3).
  • cDSPN signs were more predictive of balance disturbances compared with symptoms. ≥2 signs, OR=5.45 (95% CI, 4.11-7.11); 1 sign, OR=2.45 (95% CI, 1.82-3.28).
  • Symptoms: pain, OR=1.81 (95% CI, 1.68-1.96); paresthesia, OR=2.23 (95% CI, 2.10-2.48); loss of sensation, OR=2.04 (95% CI, 1.87-2.22).
  • Ataxia (4.3%) was more common with balance disturbances (13%) than without (3%).

Study design

  • Ambulatory adults (n=3379) living with or without HIV underwent neurologic examination to document cDSPN and reported neuropathy symptoms.
  • Participants reported balance problems and falls over the previous 10 years.
  • NIH funding.

Limitations

  • Cross-sectional design does not allow causal determination between polyneuropathy and HIV disease.
  • Ambulatory requirement for participants may miss some polyneuropathy and HIV disease.

 

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit