Almost 1.26 million alcohol hospitalisations in England in 2018/2019

  • NHS Digital

  • curated by Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Medical News
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In 2018/2019, there were an estimated 1.26 million hospital admissions in England where alcohol was the primary reason for admission or a secondary diagnosis was linked to alcohol, new figures from NHS Digital report. This represents 7.4 per cent of all hospital admissions across the country in the same period.

Forty-seven per cent of patients were aged 55-74 years and just under two-thirds were male.

Southampton had the highest rate at 4020 per 100,000 population, whereas East Sussex had the lowest rate at 1080 per 100,000 population.

Fifty-one per cent of admissions were for cardiovascular disease and 17 per cent were for mental and behavioural disorders due to alcohol use.

In England in 2018, there were 5698 alcohol-specific deaths. A further 1920 deaths were because of unspecified hepatitis and fibrosis and cirrhosis, but these deaths were only partially attributable to alcohol and were excluded.

The alcohol-specific age-standardised death rates per 100,000 population were 14.8 for males and 6.9 for females.

Seventy-seven per cent of deaths occurred in the age group of 40-69 years and 67 per cent occurred in men.

Alcoholic liver disease accounted for 79 per cent of the 5698 alcohol-specific deaths, whereas 10 per cent were from alcohol-related mental and behavioural disorders. There were a further 1920 deaths due to unspecified hepatitis and fibrosis and cirrhosis.

There were 170,000 alcohol-related prescription items dispensed in England in 2018. This is the third successive year-on-year decrease.