Antidepressants linked to increased risk of gestational diabetes


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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Antidepressants may increase the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), suggests a new research published in BMJ Open.

The nested case-control study was conducted within the Quebec Pregnancy Cohort (QPC) in Canada which includes data on all pregnancies and children born in Quebec from January 1998 to December 2015.

Cases of GDM identified after week 20 of pregnancy were randomly matched 1:10 to controls based on gestational age at index date and year of pregnancy. Antidepressants exposure was assessed by filled prescriptions between the beginning of pregnancy and the index date.

The study authors report that among 20,905 cases and 209,050 matched controls, 9,741 (4.2%) women were exposed to antidepressants. When adjusting for potential confounders, antidepressants use was associated with an increased risk of GDM (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.30). The risk was particularly high with venlafaxine (aOR 1.27; 95% CI 1.09-1.49) and amitriptyline (aOR 1.52; 95% CI 1.25-1.84).

No statistically significant association was observed for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

The authors also report that the risk of GDM was increased with a longer duration of antidepressants use, specifically for serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants and combined use of two antidepressants classes.