Black men less likely to undergo NSCLC surgery

  • Balekian AA & al.
  • Chest
  • 26 Jul 2018

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Black men were significantly less likely to undergo surgery for stage I NSCLC than whites or black women.

Why this matters

  • Unlike in previous studies of race and surgery rates, which included poor surgical candidates, this study included participants who were relatively fit and were presumably good surgical candidates.

Study design

  • 723 patients (95% white; 56% male) with stage I NSCLC National Lung Screening Trial.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • 92% underwent surgery.
  • Only 65% of black men underwent surgery compared with 93% of white men, 93% of white women, and 90% of black women.
  • After analysis by sex and race, surgery was significantly less common in black men than in white men (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.43), but black and white women had similar surgical resection rates (OR for black women, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.17-4.37] and OR for white women, 0.83 [95% CI, 0.41-1.68]).
  • Relative risk of undergoing surgery for black men compared with white men was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.50-0.99).
  • Black men underwent full resection less often than white men (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.43), as well as limited resection, although the latter was not statistically significant (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.06-1.18).

Limitations

  • Retrospective study.

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