Bladder cancer: higher lung cancer risk warrants screening

  • Clin Lung Cancer

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (TCC) have a higher risk for lung cancer than any other secondary solid tumor, and a higher lung cancer risk than the general population.

Why this matters

  • Current lung cancer screening recommendations do not include TCC as a risk factor for determining eligibility.

Study design

  • 91,606 patients with early-stage TCC from the Statistics, Epidemiology, and End Results database.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • 18% had lung cancer.
  • Lung cancer was more common in women vs men (22% vs 17%; P<.05>
  • Standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for lung cancer was higher than for all solid tumors (1.98 vs 1.61; P<.05>
  • SIR for all solid tumors was higher in men than women (1.67 vs 1.31; P<.05 but was higher in women for lung cancer vs p>
  • Overall, 5- and 10-year cumulative incidence of lung cancer was higher in patients with TCC vs the general population (3.2% vs 1.6% and 5.94% vs 3.21%, respectively).
  • Compared with patients with lung cancer without TCC, all patients with TCC had higher rates of large cell carcinomas, female patients with TCC had higher rates of squamous cell carcinoma, and male patients with TCC had higher rates of adenocarcinoma.

Limitations

  • No patient-level data on smoking incidence.