Chronic rhinosinusitis linked to increased risk of depression and anxiety


  • Mary Corcoran
  • International Medical News
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New research suggests that chronic rhinosinusitis is linked to an increased incidence of depression and anxiety, with researchers suggesting physicians should be alert to the potential comorbidities in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. 

Researchers examined data on almost 49,000 people in South Korea, of which 16,224 patients had chronic rhinosinusitis and 32,448 patients did not, to evaluate the risk of depression and anxiety in chronic rhinosinusitis. 

During an 11-year follow-up, the overall incidence of depression was significantly higher in the chronic rhinosinusitis group (24.2 per 1,000 person-years) than in the comparison group (16.0 per 1,000 person-years). The incidence of anxiety was also significantly higher in the chronic rhinosinusitis group (42.2 per 1,000 person-years) than in the comparison group (27.8 per 1,000 person-years). 

Presenting the findings in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, the authors said the study provides new insight into the effects of CRS on mental health problems. “Physicians should be aware of the potential comorbidities observed in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and provide therapy to reduce the risk of depression and anxiety in these patients," they concluded.