Coffee intake linked with improved survival in advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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Among patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), increased coffee intake is associated with lower risk of disease progression and death, concludes a study published in JAMA Oncology.

The prospective observational cohort study included 1,171 patients with previously untreated locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer who were enrolled in a phase 3 clinical trial comparing the addition of cetuximab and/or bevacizumab to standard chemotherapy. Patients reported dietary intake using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire at the time of enrollment. Data were collected from October 27, 2005 to January 18, 2018.

Increased consumption of coffee was associated with decreased risk of cancer progression (hazard ratio [HR] for 1 cup/d increment, 0.95; 95% CI 0.91-1.00; P=.04 for trend) and death (HR for 1 cup/d increment, 0.93; 95% CI 0.89-0.98; P=.004 for trend).

Participants who consumed 2-3 cups of coffee per day had a multivariable HR for overall survival (OS) of 0.82 (95% CI 0.67-1.00) and 0.82 for progression-free survival (95% CI 0.68-0.99), compared with those who did not drink coffee. Consumed ≥4 cups of coffee per day was associated with multivariable HRs of 0.64 (95% CI 0.46-0.87) and 0.78 (95% CI 0.59-1.05), respectively.

Significant associations were noted for both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.