CROI 2019—Integrase inhibitors linked to weight gain in women


  • Jim Kling
  • Conference Reports
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Takeaway

  • In HIV+ women, switching from a nonintegrase inhibitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen to a regimen including an integrase inhibitor (INSTI) is associated with increased weight, body fat, and blood pressure.

Why this matters

  • Further study is needed to understand and manage the effects of INSTIs on metabolic health in women.

Study design

  • Post hoc analysis of 1118 participants in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) who were receiving ART between 2008 and 2017.
  • Funding: WIHS is funded by NIH.

Key results

  • 884 women switched to or added an INSTI to ART (SWAD group); 234 women were not exposed to an INSTI (STAY group).
  • Women in the 2 groups had similar baseline demographics, but the SWAD group was more likely to be receiving a protease inhibitor.
  • Compared with the STAY group, women in the SWAD group had a mean 2.14 kg weight increase (P<.0001 kg>2 increase in BMI (P<.0001 and greater increase in body fat percentage>
  • Compared with the STAY group, women in the SWAD group had a greater change in systolic blood pressure (difference, +2.24 mm Hg; P<.05 and diastolic blood pressure mm hg p>

Limitations

  • Retrospective analysis.

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