Drinking lots of coffee or no coffee is tied to modestly increased CVD risk

  • Zhou A & al.
  • Am J Clin Nutr
  • 6 Mar 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • High or no coffee intake is linked to a modestly increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but the genetic variants associated with caffeine metabolism appear to have no role. 

Why this matters

  • Almost every adult in the world seems to drink coffee, but some studies have linked intake, myocardial infarction/hypertension risk, and specific genetic variants associated with slow caffeine metabolism.

Key results

  • Compared with people who had 1-2 cups/day, people who drank no coffee, decaf coffee, or >6 cups of coffee/day had CVD odds increased by 11%, 7%, and 22%, respectively.
  • Having the slow caffeine metabolizer genotype had no effect on risk.

Study design

  • UK Biobank genetic data for 347,077 people.
  • Regressed for associated coffee intake, CVD risk, any variation with metabolizer genotype.
  • Funding: JJ Mason and HS Williams Memorial Foundation, National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia.

Limitations

  • Biobank data do not represent general population.
  • Generalizability not known.

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