Early menopause tied to increased risk for fractures

  • Anagnostis P & al.
  • Endocrine
  • 10 Sep 2018

  • from Sarfaroj Khan
  • Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • This meta-analysis suggests that early menopause (EM, age at menopause 45 or >50 years, without any distinct effect on the site of the fracture.
  • No such association is observed between premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) and fracture risk.

Why this matters

  • EM and POI are associated with an increased risk for osteoporosis. However, their association with increased fracture risk has not been established and studies evaluating their association have yielded conflicting results.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 18 studies involving 462,393 postmenopausal women and 12,130 fractures evaluated the association between age at menopause and fracture risk.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Women with EM had a higher risk for fracture vs those of age at menopause >45 years (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.11-1.66; P<.002>
  • No difference in fracture risk was observed between women with POI and those of age at menopause >40 years (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.72-2.09; P=.436) or >45 years (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.22-1.29; P=.170).
  • Separate analysis demonstrated no difference with respect to nonvertebral (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 0.79-3.5; P=.177), vertebral (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.87-1.37; P=.443) and hip fractures (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.95-1.46; P=.120).

Limitations

  • Heterogeneity among included studies.