EASD 2019 — Dance 501 insulin inhalation: more rapid onset than insulin lispro


  • Brandon May
  • Conference Reports
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Dance 501, a liquid formulation of human insulin for inhalation (INH) with the aerosol Dance 501 inhaler device, was associated with a more rapid onset of action compared with subcutaneous insulin lispro in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Why this matters

  • Subcutaneous injections of insulin can be burdensome for some patients with diabetes.

Key results

  • INH was associated with a faster onset of action than insulin lispro (median differences 6.5-20 minutes; P<.02>
  • The INH group also experienced greater action in the first hour following treatment (median relative differences, 45%-107%; P<.05>
  • Both INH and insulin lispro showed a linear dose-response relationship as well as comparable total pharmacodynamic action (P>.2 for AUC_GIR0-10 hour comparison at each dose level).
  • Median relative biopotency of INH was between 12.2% and 13.0%.
  • No safety issues were associated with inhalation.

Study design

  • A total of 24 patients with T2D (mean±standard deviation age, 61.8±7.9 years; BMI, 30.4±2.6 kg/m2) who were taking daily insulin therapy were randomly assigned to either subcutaneous insulin lispro injections (n=12) or INH (n=12).
  • Doses of insulin lispro were low (12 U), medium (24 U), and high (48 U), and INH was inhaled at equivalent doses.
  • Funding: Dance Biopharm Inc.

Limitations

  • Small sample size.