Emergency care for atopic dermatitis and eczema: prevalence and financial burden are increasing

  • J Am Acad Dermatol

  • curated by Brian Richardson, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • A cross-sectional study of the National Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) indicates that the frequency and financial burden of emergency department (ED) visits for atopic dermatitis (AD) or eczema significantly increased between 2006 and 2012.

Why this matters

  • Large database analysis suggests that interventions are needed to decrease ED visits for AD and eczema.

Key results

  • The prevalence of ED visits for AD or eczema increased between 2006 and 2012 (P<.05>
  • Several factors were associated with ED visits with a primary diagnosis of AD or eczema:
    • Younger patient age, Medicaid insurance, self-pay, no-pay, lower household income, Midwest region, micropolitan area, weekends, and summer months.
  • The geometric mean cost of ED visits for AD or eczema increased from $369.07 in 2006 to $642.10 in 2012.
  • The total cost of ED visits for AD or eczema increased from $127,275,080 in 2006 to $265,541,084 in 2012.

Study design

  • ED visits from the 2006-2012 NEDS (n=198,102,435) were analyzed for prevalence, risk factors, and cost of AD and eczema.
  • Funding: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Dermatology Foundation, American Medical Association Foundation.

Limitations

  • No data on AD severity, recurrent ED visits, race/ethnicity, or treatment.

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