EVP use during pregnancy: misinformation is often to blame

  • Kapaya M & al.
  • MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
  • 1 Mar 2019

  • curated by Elisabeth Aron, MD, MPH, FACOG
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Women continue to use electronic vapor products (EVPs) during pregnancy.
  • Many of these users believe that EVPs are safer than cigarettes.

Why this matters

  • EVPs, including electronic cigarettes, typically contain nicotine, a developmental toxicant that can adversely affect pregnancy and neonatal outcomes.
  • Clear messages that EVPs are unsafe during pregnancy are needed.

Key results

  • 82.6% reported they never used EVPs.
  • Of those who used EVPs:
    • 10.4% used >3 months prior to pregnancy,
    • 7.0% used around the time of pregnancy, and
    • 1.4% used during the last 3 months of pregnancy.
  • 26.4% of women who used EVPs did not know the amount of nicotine content.
  • 54.0% of women who used EVPs around the time of pregnancy did so because of curiosity.
  • 45.2% used EVPs to help with quitting or reduce cigarette smoking. 
  • 45.2% believed EVPs were safer than cigarette smoking.

Study design

  • Population-based surveillance via survey through mail 2-6 months following delivery in 2015.
  • The sample included women from Oklahoma (n=1955) and Texas (n=1322).
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Limitations

  • Data were self-reported and subject to bias.
  • Data are only for women from Texas and Oklahoma; results may not be generalizable to other regions.

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