Fall in new cases of type 2 diabetes in countries in Europe and Asia


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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A new review suggests that the number of people developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) in high-income countries is falling, with the authors suggesting prevention strategies could be contributing to the decline. 

Researchers reviewed data from studies reporting trends of diabetes incidence in adults from 1980 to 2017. A total of 47 studies were included, which provided data on 121 separate sex specific or ethnicity specific populations. 

The researchers found that the number of people developing diabetes increased consistently from the 1990s to the early 2000s, but the number of new cases has been generally stable or falling since then. Countries that showed recent stable or decreasing trends were mainly from Europe and East Asia. However, the authors warn there is limited evidence from low and middle-income countries, where trends in diabetes incidence might be different.

The authors suggest that preventive strategies and public health education and awareness campaigns “could have contributed to this flattening of rates, suggesting that worldwide efforts to curb the diabetes epidemic over the past decade might have been effective."

The research is published in the BMJ