Fitness tied to lower risks for lung and colorectal cancer

  • Cancer

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • High cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) level is linked to lower risk for lung cancer and colorectal cancer (CRC), and improved survival after diagnosis of either disease.

Why this matters

  • Prior smaller studies lacked diversity with respect to sex and race.

Study design

  • Henry Ford Exercise Testing (FIT) project involving 49,143 adults aged 40-70 (mean, 54.0) years who underwent exercise stress testing during 1991-2009 (46.1% female, 29.3% black, 0.7% Hispanic).
  • CRF metabolic equivalents of task (METs) units categorized as
  • Funding: Conquer Cancer Foundation.    

Key results

  • Average peak METs: 9.7 for men, 8.1 for women.
  • 388 cases of lung cancer and 220 cases of CRC were diagnosed over a median 7.7-year follow-up.
  • Highest vs lowest MET category was linked to:
    • 77% decreased risk for lung cancer (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.14-0.36).
    • 61% decreased risk for CRC (HR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.23-0.66).
  • Risk for all-cause mortality in highest vs lowest MET category was:
    • 44% lower after lung cancer diagnosis (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.32-1.00).  
    • 89% lower after CRC diagnosis (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.03-0.37).
  • Increasing fitness inversely related to risks for lung cancer and CRC, subsequent mortality (all P<.01>
  • Findings supported in sensitivity analysis addressing potential reverse causation.

Limitations

  • Single fitness assessment.
  • Potential selection bias.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit