Government launches review of gender pay gap in medicine


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Professional News
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The Government has launched an independent review of the gender pay gap in medicine. The review is to be led by former Royal College of Physicians president, Jane Dacre.

Announcing the review on Monday (28 May), Health and Social Care Secretary Jeremy Hunt said it is unacceptable that NHS staff still faced gender inequality. “Even today, there remains a 15 per cent gap between the pay of our male and female doctors - this has no place in a modern employer or in the NHS, and I’m determined to eliminate this gap,” he said.

According to official figures from the Department of Health and Social Care, male doctors are paid an average of £67,788 in basic pay compared with £57,569 for female doctors, a gap of more than £10,000. Last year, the BMJ reported that, in 2016, female doctors working full time earned 34 per cent less per year than their male counterparts.

The new review will investigate the causes of the gender pay gap and the barriers to career progression that female doctors face, the predominance of men in senior roles; the effect of Clinical Excellence Awards; and geographical issues.

The process is expected to conclude at the end of 2018.

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