Hearing aids may delay or prevent dementia, depression, falls

  • Mahmoudi E & al.
  • J Am Geriatr Soc
  • 4 Sep 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Among older adults with hearing loss covered by private managed care insurance, those who used hearing aids had lower risks for several age-related adverse health outcomes.

Why this matters

Key results

  • Prevalence of hearing aid use:
    • Lower among women vs men (11.3% vs 13.3%; P<.0001>
    • Higher among whites (13.6%) vs blacks (9.8%) vs Asians (8.3%) vs Hispanics (6.5%) (P<.0001>
  • Relative to nonusers, hearing aid users had lower 3-year adjusted risks for:
    • Alzheimer’s disease or dementia (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.76-0.89).
    • Anxiety or depression (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.86-0.93).
    • Injurious falls (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.95).

Study design

  • Retrospective cohort study using 2008-2016 national longitudinal claims data from a large private payer for 114,862 adults aged ≥66 years with hearing loss.
  • Main outcomes: diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease/dementia, anxiety/depression, injurious falls within 3 years of hearing loss diagnosis.
  • Funding: National Institutes of Health; University of Michigan Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center.

Limitations

  • Reliance on claims data.
  • Unmeasured, residual confounding.
  • Frequency, duration of hearing aid use unknown.
  • Generalizability unclear.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit