In-person counseling, pharmacotherapy best for smoking cessation

  • Lung Cancer

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • In-person counseling and pharmacotherapy were the most effective smoking cessation techniques at 12 months, according to a meta-analysis.

Why this matters

  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services requires that clinicians provide smoking cessation counseling to current smokers undergoing lung cancer screening (LCS) but does not stipulate which interventions clinicians should recommend.
  • A number of trials comparing smoking cessation techniques are underway, but results are not expected for years.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 85 studies of smoking cessation technique effectiveness in 140,671 current smokers.
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • At 6 months, overall smoking cessation efficacy was statistically significant for electronic/web-based interventions (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.03-1.25), in-person counseling (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.25-1.70), and pharmacotherapy (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.33-1.77); telephone counseling was also effective but did not reach statistical significance (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.98-1.50).
  • At 12 months, overall efficacy was lower among all interventions and remained significant only for pharmacotherapy (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.17-1.84) and in-person counseling (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.09-1.51).
  • Multimodal interventions are likely more effective than single-modality interventions, although data were inconclusive.

Limitations

  • Some studies included individuals not eligible for LCS.

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